Pay $1000 to criticize a bad ‘blood test for depression’ article?

pay to play-1No way, call for retraction.

Would you pay $1,000 for the right to criticize bad science in the journal in which it originally appeared? That is what it costs to participate in postpublication peer review at the online Nature Publishing Group (NPG) journal, Translational Psychiatry.

Damn, NPG is a high-fashion brand, but peer review is quite fallible, even at an NPG npgxJournal. Should we have to pay to point out the flawed science that even NPG inevitably delivers? You’d think we were doing them a favor in terms of quality control.

Put differently, should the self-correction on which scientific progress so thoroughly depends require critics be willing to pay, presumably out of their own personal funds? Sure, granting agencies now reimburse publication costs for the research they fund, but a critique is unlikely to qualify.

Take another perspective: Suppose you have asmall data set of patients for whom you have blood samples.  The limited value of the data set was further comporimsed by substantial, nonrandom loss to follow-up. But you nonetheless want to use it to solicit industry funding for a “blood test for depression.” Would you be willing to pay a premium of $3,600-$3,900 to publish your results in a prestigious NPG journal, with the added knowledge that it would be insulated from critics?

I was curious just who would get so worked up about an article that they would pay $1,000 to complain.

So, I put Translational Psychiatry in PUBLICATION NAME at Web of Science. It yielded 379 entries. I then applied the restriction CORRESPONDENCE and that left only two entries.

Both were presenting original data and did not even cite another article in Translational Psychiatry.  Maybe the authors were trying to get a publication into an NPG journal on the cheap, at a discount of $2,600.

P2PinvestIt appears that nobody has ever published a letter to the editor in Translational Psychiatry. Does that mean that there has never ever been anything about which to complain? Is everything we find in Translational Psychiatry perfectly trustworthy?

I recently posted at Mind the Brain and elsewhere about a carefully-orchestrated media campaign promoting some bad science published in Translational Psychiatry. An extraordinary publicity effort disseminated a Northwestern University press release and video to numerous media outlets. There was an explicit appeal for industry funding for the development of what was supposedly a nearly clinic-ready inexpensive blood test for depression.

The Translational Psychiatry website where I learned of these publication costs displays the standard NPG message that becomes mocking by a paywall that effectively blocks critics:

“A key strength of NPG is its close relationship with the scientific community. Working closely with scientists, listening to what they say, and always placing emphasis on quality rather than quantity, has made NPG the leading scientific publisher at finding innovative solutions to scientists’ information needs.”

The website also contains the standard NPG assurances about authors’ disclosures of conflicts of interest:

“The statement must contain an explicit and unambiguous statement describing any potential conflict of interest, or lack thereof, for any of the authors as it relates to the subject of the report”

The authors of this particular paper declared:

“EER is named as an inventor on two pending patent applications, filed and owned by Northwestern University. The remaining authors declare no conflict of interest.”

Does this disclosure give readers much clarity concerning the authors’ potential financial conflict of interest? Check out this marketing effort exploiting the Translational Psychiatry article.

Northwestern Researchers Develop RT-qPCR Assay for Depression Biomarkers, Seek Industry Partners

I have also raised questions about a lack of disclosures of conflicts of interest from promoters of Triple P Parenting. The developers claimed earlier that their program was owned by the University of Queensland, so there was no conflict of interest to declare. Further investigation  of the university website revealed that the promoters got a lucrative third of proceeds. Once that was revealed, a flood of erratum notices disclosing the financial conflicts of interest of Triple P promoters followed – at least 10 so far. For instance

triple P erratum PNG
Please Click to Enlarge

How bad is the bad science?

You can find the full Translational Psychiatry article here. The abstract provides a technical but misleading summary of results:

“Abundance of the DGKA, KIAA1539 and RAPH1 transcripts remained significantly different between subjects with MDD and ND controls even after post-CBT remission (defined as PHQ-9 <5). The ROC area under the curve for these transcripts demonstrated high discriminative ability between MDD and ND participants, regardless of their current clinical status. Before CBT, significant co-expression network of specific transcripts existed in MDD subjects who subsequently remitted in response to CBT, but not in those who remained depressed. Thus, blood levels of different transcript panels may identify the depressed from the nondepressed among primary care patients, during a depressive episode or in remission, or follow and predict response to CBT in depressed individuals.”

This was simplified in a press release that echoed in shamelessly churnalized media coverage. For instance:

“If the levels of five specific RNA markers line up together, that suggests that the patient will probably respond well to cognitive behavioral therapy, Redei said. “This is the first time that we can predict a response to psychotherapy,” she added.”

The unacknowledged problems of the article began with the authors only having 32 depressed primary-care patients at baseline and their diagnostic status not having been  confirmed by gold standard semi-structured interviews by professionals.

But the problems get worse. For the critical comparison of patients who recovered in cognitive behavioral therapy versus those that did not occurred in the subsample of nine recovered versus 13 unrecovered patients remaining after a loss-to-follow-up of 10 patients. Baseline results for the 9 +13= 22 patients in the follow-up sample did not even generalize back to the original full sample. How, then, could the authors argue that the results apply to the 23 million or so depressed patients in the United States? Well, they apparently felt they could better-generalize back to the original sample, if not the United States, by introducing an analysis of covariance that controlled for age, race and sex.  (For those of you who are tracking the more technical aspects of this discussion, contemplate the implications of controlling for three variables in a between-groups comparison of nine versus 13 patients. Apparently the authors believe that readers would accept the adjusted analyses in place of the unadjusted analyses which had obvious problems of generalizability. The reviewers apparently accepted this.).

Finally, treatment with cognitive behavior therapy was confounded with uncontrolled treatment with antidepressants.

I won’t discuss here the other problems of the study noted in my earlier blog posts. But I think you can see that these are analyses of a small data set truly unsuitable for publication in Translational Psychiatry and serving as a basis for seeking industry funding for a blood test for depression.

As I sometimes do, I tried to move from blog posts about what I considered problematic to a formal letter to the editor to which the authors would have an opportunity to reply. It was then that I discovered the publication costs.

So what are the alternatives to a letter to the editor?

Letters to the editor are a particularly weak form of post-publication peer review. There is little evidence that they serve as an effective self-correction mechanism for science. Letters to the editor seldom alter the patterns of citations of the articles about which they complain.

pay to paly2Even if I paid the $1,000 fee, I would only have been entitled to 700 words to make my case that this article is scientifically flawed and misleading. I’m not sure that a similar fee would be required from the authors to reply. Maybe responding to critics is part of the original package that they purchased from NPG. We cannot tell from what appears in the journal because the necessity of responding to a critic has not yet occurred.

It is quite typical across journals, even those not charging for a discussion of published papers, to limit the exchanges to a single letter per correspondent and a single response from the authors. And the window for acceptance of letters is typically limited to a few weeks or months after an article has appeared. While letters to the editor are often peer-reviewed, replies from authors typically do not receive peer review.

A different outcome, maybe

I recently followed up blogging about the serious flaws of a paper published in PNAS by Fredrickson and colleagues with a letter to the editor. They in turn responded. Compare our letters to see why the uninformed reader might infer that only confusion had been generated by either of them. But stay tuned…

The two letters would have normally ended any exchange.

However, this time my co-authors and I thoroughly re-analyzed the Fredrickson et al data and PNAS allowed us to publish our results. This time, we did not mince words:

“Not only is Fredrickson et al.’s article conceptually deficient, but more crucially statistical analyses are fatally flawed, to the point that their claimed results are in fact essentially meaningless.”

In the supplementary materials, we provided in excruciating detail our analytic strategy and results. The authors’ response was again dismissive and confusing.

The authors next refused our offer for an adversarial collaboration in which both parties would lay responses to each other with a mediator in order to allow readers to reach some resolution. However, the strengths of our arguments and reanalysis – which included thousands of regression equations, some with randomly generated data – are such others have now calling for a retraction of the original Fredrickson and Cole paper. If that occurs, it would be an extraordinarily rare event.

Limits on journals impose on post-peer-review commentary severely constrain the ability of science to self-correct.

The Reproducibility Project: Psychology is widely being hailed as a needed corrective for the crisis of credibility in science. But replications of studies such as this one involving pre-post sampling of genomic expression from an intervention trial are costly and unlikely to be undertaken. And why attempt a “replication” of findings that have no merit in the first place? After all, the authors’ results for baseline assessments did not replicate in the baseline results of patients still available at follow-up. That suggests a table problem, and that attempts at replication would be futile.

plosThe PLOS journals have introduced the innovation of allowing comments to be placed directly at the journal article’s webpage, with their existence acknowledged on the article itself. Anyone can respond and participate in a post-publication peer review process that can go on for the life of the interest in a particular article. The next stage in furthering post-publication peer review is that such comments be indexed and citable and counted in traditional metrics, as well as altmetrics. This would recognize citizen scientists’ contributions to cleaning up what appears to be a high rate of false positives and outright nonsense in the current literature.

pubmedcommonsPubMed Commons offers the opportunity to post comments on any of the over 23 million entries in PubMed, expanding the PLOS initiative to all journals, even those of the Nature Publishing Group. Currently, the only restriction is that someone attempting to place a comment have authored any of the 23,000,000+ entries in PubMed, even a letter to the editor. This represents progress.

But similar to the PLOS initiative, PubMed Commons will get more traction when it can provide conventional academic credit –countable citations– to contributors identifying and critiquing bad science. Currently authors can get credit for putting bad science into the literature that no one can get for  helping getting it recognized as such.

So, the authors of this particular article have made indefensibly bad claims about having made substantial progress toward developing an inexpensive blood test for depression. It’s not unreasonable to assume their motive is to cultivate financial support from industry for further development. What’s a critic to do?

In this case, the science is bad enough and the damage to the public and professionals’ perception of the state of the science of ‘blood test for depression’ sufficient for  a retraction is warranted. Stay tuned – unless Nature Publishing Group requires a $1,000 payment for investigating whether an article warrants retraction.

Postscript: As I was finishing this post, I discovered that the journals published by the  Modern Language Society requires  payment of a $3,000 membership fee to publish a letter to the editor in one of their journals. I guess they need to keep the discussion within the club. 

Views expressed in this blog post are entirely those of the author and not necessarily those of PLOS or its staff.

Special thanks to Skeptical Cat.skeptical sleuth cat 8 30 14-1

4 thoughts on “Pay $1000 to criticize a bad ‘blood test for depression’ article?”

  1. I’m an editor at Frontiers, also an Open Access journal that requires article fees from authors, but one of the great things in this journal is that 1000 word commentary articles (on any research, whether it was published in Frontiers or not) are free of charge. I would suggest you consider submitting your commentary at a Frontiers section most closely related to the topic.

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