Delusional? Trial in Lancet Psychiatry claims brief CBT reduces paranoid delusions

lancet psychiatryIn this issue of Mind the Brain, I demonstrate a quick assessment of the conduct and reporting of a clinical trial.  The authors claimed in Lancet Psychiatry a “first ever” in targeting “worries” with brief cognitive therapy as a way of reducing persistent persecutory delusions in psychotic persons. A Guardian article written by the first author claims effects were equivalent to what is obtained with antipsychotic medication. Lancet Psychiatry allowed the authors a sidebar to their article presenting glowing testimonials of 3 patients making extraordinary gains. Oxford University lent its branding* to the first author’s workshop promoted with a video announcing a status of “evidence-based” for the treatment.

There is much claiming to be new here. Is it a breakthrough in treatment of psychosis and in standards for reporting a clinical trial? Or is what is new not praiseworthy?

I identify the kinds of things that I sought in first evaluating the Lancet Psychiatry article and what additional information needed to be consulted to assess the contribution to the field and relevance to practice.

The article is available open access.

Its publication was coordinated with the first author’s extraordinarily self-promotional elarticle in The Guardian

The Guardian article makes the claim that

benefits were what scientists call “moderate” – not a magic bullet, but with meaningful effects nonetheless – and are comparable with what’s seen with many anti-psychotic medications.

The advertisement for the workshop is here

 

The Lancet Psychiatry article also cites the author’s self-help book for lay persons. There was no conflict of interest declared.

Probing the article’s Introduction

Reports of clinical trials should be grounded in a systematic review of the existing literature. This allows readers to place the study in the context of existing research and the unsolved clinical and research problems the literature poses. This background prepares the reader to evaluate the contribution the particular trial can make.

Just by examining the references for the introduction, we can find signs of a very skewed presentation.

The introduction cites 13 articles, 10 of which are written by the author and an eleventh is written by a close associate. The remaining 2 citations are more generic, to a book and an article about causality.

Either the author is at the world center of this kind of research or seriously deficient in his attention to the larger body of evidence. At the outset, the author announces a bold reconceptualization of the role of worry in causing psychotic symptoms:

Worry is an expectation of the worst happening. It consists of repeated negative thoughts about potential adverse outcomes, and is a psychological component of anxiety. Worry brings implausible ideas to mind, keeps them there, and increases the level of distress. Therefore we have postulated that worry is a causal factor in the development and maintenance of persecutory delusions, and have tested this theory in several studies.

This is controversial, to say the least. The everyday experience of worrying is being linked to persecutory delusions. A simple continuum seems to be proposed – people can start off with everyday worrying and end out with a psychotic delusion and twenty years of receiving psychiatric services. Isn’t this too simplistic or just plain wrong?

Has no one but the author done relevant work or even reacted to the author’s work? The citations provided in the introduction suggest the author’s work is all we need in order to interpret this study in the larger context of what is known about psychotic persecutory delusions.

Contrast my assessment with the author’s own:

Panel 2: Research in context
Systematic review We searched the ISRCTN trial registry and the PubMed database with the search terms “worry”,“delusions”. “persecutory”,“paranoia”,and “schizophrenia”without date restrictions, for English-language publications of randomised controlled trials investigating the treatment of worry in patients with persecutory delusions. Other than our pilot investigation12 there were no other such clinical trials in the medical literature. We also examined published meta-analyses on standard cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for persistent delusions or hallucinations, or both.

The problem is that “worry” is a nonspecific colloquial term, not a widely used scientific one. For the author to require that studies have “worry” as a keyword in order to be retrieved is a silly restriction.

PubMedI welcome readers to redo the PubMed search dropping this term. Next replace “worry” with “anxiety.” Furthermore, the author makes unsubstantiated assumptions about a causal role for worry/anxiety in development of delusions. Drop the “randomized controlled trial” restriction from the PubMed search and you find a large relevant literature. Persons with schizophrenia and persecutory delusions are widely acknowledged to be anxious. But you won’t find much suggestion in this literature that the anxiety is causal or that people progress from worrying about something to developing schizophrenia and persecutory delusions. This seems a radical version gone wild of the idea that normal and psychotic experiences are on a continuum, concocted with a careful avoidance of contrary evidence.

Critical appraisal of clinical trials often skips examination of whether the background literature cited to justify the study is accurate and balanced. I think this brief foray has demonstrated that it can be important in establishing whether an investigator is claiming false authority for a view with cherry picking and selective attention to the literature.

Basic design of the study

The 150 patients randomized in this study are around 40 years old. Half of the sample of has been in psychiatric services for 11 or more years, with 29% of the patients in the intervention group and 19% in the control group receiving services for more than 20 years. The article notes in passing that all patients were prescribed antipsychotic medication at the outset of the study except 1 in the intervention group and 9 in the control group – 1:9? It is puzzling how such differences emerged if randomization was successful in controlling for baseline differences. Maybe it demonstrates the limitations of block randomization.

The intervention is decidedly low intensity for what is presumably a long standing symptom in chronically psychotic population.

We aimed to provide the CBT worry-reduction intervention in six sessions over 8 weeks. Each session lasted roughly an hour and took place in NHS clinics or at patients’ homes.

The six sessions were organized around booklets shared by the patient and therapist.

The main techniques were psychoeducation about worry, identification and reviewing of positive and negative beliefs about worry, increasing awareness of the initiation of worry and individual triggers, use of worry periods, planning activity at times of worry (which could include relaxation), and learning to let go of worry.

Patients were expected to practice exercises from the author’s self-help book for lay persons.

The two main practical techniques to reduce worry were then introduced: the use of worry periods (confining worry to about a 20 minute set period each day) and planning of activities at peak worry times. Worry periods were implemented flexibly. For example, most patients set up one worry period a day, but they could choose to have two worry periods a day or, in severe instances, patients instead aimed for a worry-free period. Ideally, the worry period was then substituted with a problem-solving period.

Compared to what?

The treatment of the control group was ill-defined routine care “delivered according to national and local service protocols and guidelines.” Readers are not told how much treatment the patients received or whether their care was actually congruent with these guidelines. Routine care of mental health patients in the community is notoriously deficient. That over half of these patients had been in services for more than a decade suggests that treatment for many of them had tapered off and was being delivered with no expectation of improvement.

To accept this study as an evaluation of the author’s therapy approach, we need to know how much in the way of other treatment was received by patients in both the intervention and control group. Were patients in the routine care condition, as I suspect, largely being ignored? The intervention group got 6 sessions of therapy over 8 weeks. Is that a substantial increase in psychotherapy or even in time to talk with a professional over what they would otherwise receive? Did being assigned to the intervention also increase patients’ other contact with mental health services? If the intervention therapists heard that patients was having problems with medication or serious unmet medical needs, how did they respond?

The authors report collecting data concerning receipt of services with the Client Service Receipt Inventory, but nowhere is that reported.

Most basically, we don’t know what elements the comparison/control group controlled. We have no reason to presume that the amount of contact time and basic relationship with a treatment provider was controlled.

As I have argued before, it is inappropriate and arguably unethical to use ill defined routine care or treatment-as-usual in the evaluation of a psychological intervention. We cannot tell if any apparent benefits to patients having been assigned to the intervention are due to correcting the inadequacies of routine care, including its missing of basic elements of support, attention, and encouragement. We therefore cannot tell if there are effective elements to the intervention other than  these nonspecific factors.

We cannot tell if any positive results to this trial suggest encourage dissemination and implementation or only improving likely deficiencies in the treatment received by patients in long term psychiatric care.

In terms of quickly evaluating articles reporting clinical trials, we see that imply asking “compared to what” and jumping to the comparison/control condition revealed a lot of deficiencies at the outset in what this trial could reveal.

Measuring outcomes

Two primary outcomes were declared – changes in the Penn State Worry Questionnaire and the Psychotic Symptoms Rating Scale- Delusion (PSYRATS-delusion) subscale. The authors use multivariate statistical techniques to determine whether patients assigned to the intervention group improved more on either of these measures, and whether specifically reduction in worry caused reductions in persecutory delusions.

Understand what is at stake here: the authors are trying to convince us that this is a groundbreaking study that shows that reducing worry with a brief intervention reduces long standing persecutory delusions.

The authors lose substantial credibility if we look closely at their primary measures, including their items, not just the scale names.

what-me-worry-715605The Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ) is a 16 item questionnaire widely used with college student, community and clinical samples. Items include

When I am under pressure I worry a lot.

I am always worrying about something.

And reverse direction items scored so greater endorsement indicates less worrying –

I do not tend to worry about things.

I never worry about anything.

I know, how many times does basically the same question have to be asked?

The questionnaire is meant to be general. It focuses on a single complaint that could be a symptom of anxiety. While the questionnaire could be used to screening for anxiety disorders, it does not provide a diagnosis of a mental disorder, which requires other symptoms be present. Actually, worry is only one of three components of anxiety. The others are physiological – like racing heart, sweating, or trembling – and behavioral – like avoidance or procrastination.

But “worry” is also a feature of depressed mood. Another literature discusses “worry” as “rumination.” We should not be surprised to find this questionnaire functions reasonably well as a screen for depression.

But past research has shown that even in nonclinical populations, using a cutpoint to designate high versus low worriers results in unstable classification. Without formal intervention, many of those who are “high” become  “low” over time.

In order to be included in this study, patients had to have a minimum score of 44 on the PSWQ. If we skip to the results of the study we find that the patients in the intervention group dropped from 64.8 to 56.1 and those receiving only routine care dropped from 64.5 to 59.8. The average patient in either group would have still qualified for inclusion in the study at the end of follow up.

The second outcome measure, the Psychotic Symptoms Rating Scale- Delusion subscale has six items: duration and frequency of preoccupation; intensity of distress; amount of distressing content; conviction and disruption. Each item is scored 0-4, with 0 = no problem and 4 = maximum severity.

The items are so diverse that interpretation of a change in the context of an intervention trial targeting worry becomes difficult. Technically speaking, the lack of comparability among items is so great that the measure cannot be considered an interval scale for which conventional parametric statistics could be used. We cannot reasonably assume changes in one item is equivalent to changes in other items.

It would seem, for instance, that amount of preoccupation with delusions, amount and intensity of distress, and amount of preoccupation with delusions are very different matters. The intervention group changed from a mean of 18.7 on a scale with a possible score of 24 to 13.6 at 24 weeks; the control group from 18.0 to 16.4. This change could simply represent reduction in the amount and intensity of distress, not in patients’ preoccupation with the delusions, their conviction that the delusions are true, or the disruption in their lives. Overall, the PSYRATS-delusion subscale is not a satisfactory measure on which to make strong claims about reducing worry reducing delusions. The measure is too contaminated with content similar to the worries questionnaire. We might only be finding ‘changes in worries results in changes in worries.”

Checking primary outcomes is important in evaluating a clinical trial, but in this case, it was crucial to examine what the measures assessed at an item content level. Too often reviewers uncritically accept the name of an instrument as indicating what it validly measures when used as an outcome measure.

The fancy multivariate analyses do not advance our understanding of what went on in the study. The complex statistical analyses might simply be demonstrating patients were less worried as seen in questionnaires and interview ratings based on what patients say when asked whether they are distressed.

My summary assessment is that a low intensity intervention is being evaluated against an ill-defined treatment as usual. The outcome measures are too nonspecific and overlapping to be helpful. We may simply be seeing effects of contact and reassurance among patients who are not getting much of either. So what?

testimonialsBring on the patient endorsements

Panel 1: Patient comments on the intervention presents glowing endorsements from 3 of the 73 patients assigned to the intervention group. The first patient describes the treatment as “extremely helpful” and as providing a “breakthrough.” The second patient suggests describing starting treatment being lost and without self-confidence but now being relaxed at times of the day that had previously been stressful. The third patient declared

“The therapy was very rewarding. There wasn’t anything I didn’t like. I needed that kind of therapy at the time because if I  didn’t have that therapy at that time, I wouldn’t be here.

Wow, but these dramatic gains seem inconsistent with the modest gains registered with the quantitative primary outcome measures. We are left guessing how these endorsements were elicited – where they obtained in a context where patients were expected to express gratitude for the extra attention they received? –  and the criteria by which the particular quotes were selected from what is presumably a larger pool.

Think of the outcry if Lancet Psychiatry extended this innovation to reporting of clinical trials to evaluations of medications by their developers. If such side panels are going to be retained in the future in the reporting of a clinical trial, maybe it would be best that they be marked “advertisement” and accompanied by a declaration of conflict of interest.

A missed opportunity to put the authors’ intervention to a fair test

In the Discussion section the authors state

although we think it highly unlikely that befriending or supportive counselling [sic] would have such persistent effects on worry and delusions, this possibility will have to be tested specifically in this group.

Actually, the authors don’t have much evidence of anything but a weak effect that might well have been achieved with befriending or supportive counseling delivered by persons with less training. We should be careful of accepting claims of any clinically significant effects on delusions. At best, the authors have evidence that distress associated with delusions was reduced and that in any coordination in scores between the two measurs may simply reflect confounding of the two outcome measures.

It is a waste of scarce research funds, an unethical waste of patients willingness to contribute to science to compare this low intensity psychotherapy to ill-described, unquantified treatment as usual. Another low intensity treatment like befriending or supportive counseling might provide sufficient elements of attention, support, and raised expectations to achieve comparable results.

Acknowledging the Supporting Cast

In evaluating reports of clinical trials, it is often informative to look to footnotes and acknowledgments, as well as the main text. This article acknowledges Anthony Morrison as a member of the Trial Steering Committee and Douglas Turkington as a member of the Data Monitoring and Ethics Committee. Readers of Mind the Brain might recognize Morrison as first author of a Lancet trial that I critiqued for exaggerated claims and Turkington as the first author of a trial that became an internet sensation when post-publication reviewers pointed out fundamental problems in the reporting of data.  Turkington and an editor of the journal in which the report of the trial was published counterattacked.

All three of these trials involve exaggerated claims based on a comparison between CBT and an ill-defined routine care. Like the present one, Morrison’s trial failed to report data concerning collected receipt of services. And in an interview with Lancet, Morrison admitted to avoiding a comparison between CBT and anything but routine care out of concern that differences might not be found with any treatment providing a supportive relationship, even basic supportive counseling.

MRCA note to funders

This project (09/160/06) was awarded by the Efficacy and Mechanism Evaluation (EME) Programme, and is funded by the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) and managed by the UK NHS National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) on behalf of the MRC-NIHR partnership.

Really, UK MRC, you are squandering scarce funds on methodologically poor, often small trials for which investigators make extravagant claims and that don’t include a comparison group allowing control for nonspecific effects. You really ought to insist on better attention to the existing literature in justifying another trial and adequate controls for amount of contact time, attention and support.

Don’t you see the strong influence of investigator allegiance dictating reporting of results consistent with the advancement of the investigators’ product?

I don’t understand why you allowed the investigator group to justify the study with such idiosyncratic, highly selective review of the literature driven by substituting a colloquial term “worry” for more commonly used search terms.

Do you have independent review of grants by persons who are more accepting of the usual conventions of conducting and reporting trials? Or are you faced with the problems of a small group of reviewers giving out money to like-minded friends and family? Note that the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) has effectively dealt with inbred old boy networks by excluding Germans from the panels of experts reviewing German grants. Might you consider the same strategy in getting more seriously about funding projects with some potential for improving patient care? Get with it, insist on rigor and reproducibility in what you fund.

*We should make too much of Oxford lending its branding to this workshop. Look at the workshops to which Harvard Medical School lends its labels.

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