Before you enroll your child in the MAGENTA chronic fatigue syndrome study: Issues to be considered

[October 3 8:23 AM Update: I have now inserted Article 21 of the Declaration of Helsinki below, which is particularly relevant to discussions of the ethical problems of Dr. Esther Crawley’s previous SMILE trial.]

Petitions are calling for shutting down the MAGENTA trial. Those who organized the effort and signed the petition are commendably brave, given past vilification of any effort by patients and their allies to have a say about such trials.

Below I identify a number of issues that parents should consider in deciding whether to enroll their children in the MAGENTA trial or to withdraw them if they have already been enrolled. I take a strong stand, but I believe I have adequately justified and documented my points. I welcome discussion to the contrary.

This is a long read but to summarize the key points:

  • The MAGENTA trial does not promise any health benefits for the children participating in the trial. The information sheet for the trial was recently modified to suggest they might benefit. However, earlier versions clearly stated that no benefit was anticipated.
  • There is inadequate disclosure of likely harms to children participating in the trial.
  • An estimate of a health benefit can be evaluated from the existing literature concerning the effectiveness of the graded exercise therapy intervention with adults. Obtaining funding for the MAGENTA trial depended on a misrepresentation of the strength of evidence that it works in adult populations.  I am talking about the PACE trial.
  • Beyond any direct benefit to their children, parents might be motivated by the hope of contributing to science and the availability of effective treatments. However, these possible benefits depend on publication of results of a trial after undergoing peer review. The Principal Investigator for the MAGENTA trial, Dr. Esther Crawley, has a history of obtaining parents’ consent for participation of their children in the SMILE trial, but then not publishing the results in a timely fashion. Years later, we are still waiting.
  • Dr. Esther Crawley exposed children to unnecessary risk without likely benefit in her conduct of the SMILE trial. This clinical trial involved inflicting a quack treatment on children. Parents were not adequately informed of the nature of the treatment and the absence of evidence for any mechanism by which the intervention could conceivably be effective. This reflects on the due diligence that Dr. Crawley can be expected to exercise in the MAGENTA trial.
  • The consent form for the MAGENTA trial involves parents granting permission for the investigator to use children and parents’ comments concerning effects of the treatment for its promotion. Insufficient restrictions are placed on how the comments can be used. There is the clear precedent of comments made in the context of the SMILE trial being used to promote the quack Lightning Process treatment in the absence of evidence that treatment was actually effective in the trial. There is no guarantee that any comments collected from children and parents in the MAGENTA trial would not similarly be misused.
  • Dr. Esther Crawley participated in a smear campaign against parents having legitimate concerns about the SMILE trial. Parents making legitimate use of tools provided by the government such as Freedom of Information Act requests, appeals of decisions of ethical review boards and complaints to the General Medical Council were vilified and shamed.
  • Dr. Esther Crawley has provided direct, self-incriminating quotes in the newsletter of the Science Media Centre about how she was coached and directed by their staff to slam the patient community.  She played a key role in a concerted and orchestrated attack on the credibility of not only parents of participants in the MAGENTA trial, but of all patients having chronic fatigue syndrome/ myalgic encephalomyelitis , as well as their advocates and allies.

I am not a parent of a child eligible for recruitment to the MAGENTA trial. I am not even a citizen or resident of the UK. Nonetheless, I have considered the issues and lay out some of my considerations below. On this basis, I signed the global support version  of the UK petition to suspend all trials of graded exercise therapy in children and adults with ME/CFS. I encourage readers who are similarly in my situation outside the UK to join me in signing the global support petition.

If I were a parent of an eligible child or a resident of the UK, I would not enroll my child in MAGENTA. I would immediately withdraw my child if he or she were currently participating in the trial. I would request all the child’s data be given back or evidence that it had been destroyed.

I recommend my PLOS Mind the Brain post, What patients should require before consenting to participate in research…  as either a prelude or epilogue to the following blog post.

What you will find here is a discussion of matters that parents should consider before enrolling their children in the MAGENTA trial of graded exercise for chronic fatigue syndrome. The previous blog post [http://blogs.plos.org/mindthebrain/2015/12/09/what-patients-should-require-before-consenting-to-participate-in-research/ ]  is rich in links to an ongoing initiative from The BMJ to promote broader involvement of patients (and implicitly, parents of patients) in the design, implementation, and interpretation of clinical trials. The views put forth by The BMJ are quite progressive, even if there is a gap between their expression of views and their actual implementation. Overall, that blog post presents a good set of standards for patients (and parents) making informed decisions concerning enrollment in clinical trials.

Simon McGrathLate-breaking update: See also

Simon McGrath: PACE trial shows why medicine needs patients to scrutinise studies about their health

Basic considerations.

Patients are under no obligation to participate in clinical trials. It should be recognized that any participation typically involves burden and possibly risk over what is involved in receiving medical care outside of a clinical trial.

It is a deprivation of their human rights and a violation of the Declaration of Helsinki to coerce patients to participate in medical research without freely given, fully informed consent.

Patients cannot be denied any medical treatment or attention to which they would otherwise be entitled if they fail to enroll in a clinical trial.

Issues are compounded when consent from parents is sought for participation of vulnerable children and adolescents for whom they have legal responsibility. Although assent to participate in clinical trials is sought from children and adolescents, it remains for their parents to consent to their participation.

Parents can at any time withdraw their consent for their children and adolescents participating in trials and have their data removed, without requiring the approval of any authorities of their reason for doing so.

Declaration of Helsinki

The World Medical Association (WMA) has developed the Declaration of Helsinki as a statement of ethical principles for medical research involving human subjects, including research on identifiable human material and data.

It includes:

In medical research involving human subjects capable of giving informed consent, each potential subject must be adequately informed of the aims, methods, sources of funding, any possible conflicts of interest, institutional affiliations of the researcher, the anticipated benefits and potential risks of the study and the discomfort it may entail, post-study provisions and any other relevant aspects of the study. The potential subject must be informed of the right to refuse to participate in the study or to withdraw consent to participate at any time without reprisal. Special attention should be given to the specific information needs of individual potential subjects as well as to the methods used to deliver the information.

[October 3 8:23 AM Update]: I have now inserted Article 21 of the Declaration of Helsinki which really nails the ethical problems of the SMILE trial:

21. Medical research involving human subjects must conform to generally accepted scientific principles, be based on a thorough knowledge of the scientific literature, other relevant sources of information, and adequate laboratory and, as appropriate, animal experimentation. The welfare of animals used for research must be respected.

There is clearly in adequate scientific justification for testing the quack Lightning Process Treatment.

What Is the Magenta Trial?

The published MAGENTA study protocol states

This study aims to investigate the acceptability and feasibility of carrying out a multicentre randomised controlled trial investigating the effectiveness of graded exercise therapy compared with activity management for children/teenagers who are mildly or moderately affected with CFS/ME.

Methods and analysis 100 paediatric patients (8–17 years) with CFS/ME will be recruited from 3 specialist UK National Health Service (NHS) CFS/ME services (Bath, Cambridge and Newcastle). Patients will be randomised (1:1) to receive either graded exercise therapy or activity management. Feasibility analysis will include the number of young people eligible, approached and consented to the trial; attrition rate and treatment adherence; questionnaire and accelerometer completion rates. Integrated qualitative methods will ascertain perceptions of feasibility and acceptability of recruitment, randomisation and the interventions. All adverse events will be monitored to assess the safety of the trial.

The first of two treatments being compared is:

Arm 1: activity management

This arm will be delivered by CFS/ME specialists. As activity management is currently being delivered in all three services, clinicians will not require further training; however, they will receive guidance on the mandatory, prohibited and flexible components (see online supplementary appendix 1). Clinicians therefore have flexibility in delivering the intervention within their National Health Service (NHS) setting. Activity management aims to convert a ‘boom–bust’ pattern of activity (lots 1 day and little the next) to a baseline with the same daily amount before increasing the daily amount by 10–20% each week. For children and adolescents with CFS/ME, these are mostly cognitive activities: school, schoolwork, reading, socialising and screen time (phone, laptop, TV, games). Those allocated to this arm will receive advice about the total amount of daily activity, including physical activity, but will not receive specific advice about their use of exercise, increasing exercise or timed physical exercise.

So, the first arm of the trial is a comparison condition consisting of standard care delivered without further training of providers. The treatment is flexibly delivered, expected to vary between settings, and thus largely uncontrolled. The treatment represents a methodologically weak condition that does not adequately control for attention and positive expectations. Control conditions should be equivalent to the intervention being evaluated in these dimensions.

The second arm of the study:

Arm 2: graded exercise therapy (GET)

This arm will be delivered by referral to a GET-trained CFS/ME specialist who will receive guidance on the mandatory, prohibited and flexible components (see online supplementary appendix 1). They will be encouraged to deliver GET as they would in their NHS setting.20 Those allocated to this arm will be offered advice that is focused on exercise with detailed assessment of current physical activity, advice about exercise and a programme including timed daily exercise. The intervention will encourage children and adolescents to find a baseline level of exercise which will be increased slowly (by 10–20% a week, as per NICE guidance5 and the Pacing, graded Activity and Cognitive behaviour therapy – a randomised Evaluation (PACE)12 ,21). This will be the median amount of daily exercise done during the week. Children and adolescents will also be taught to use a heart rate monitor to avoid overexertion. Participants will be advised to stay within the target heart rate zones of 50–70% of their maximum heart rate.5 ,7

The outcome of the trial will be evaluated in terms of

Quantitative analysis

The percentage recruited of those eligible will be calculated …Retention will be estimated as the percentage of recruited children and adolescents reaching the primary 6-month follow-up point, who provide key outcome measures (the Chalder Fatigue Scale and the 36-Item Short-Form Physical Functioning Scale (SF-36 PFS)) at that assessment point.

actigraphObjective data will be collected in the form of physical activity measured by Accelerometers. These are

Small, matchbox-sized devices that measure physical activity. They have been shown to provide reliable indicators of physical activity among children and adults.

However, actual evaluation of the outcome of the trial will focus on recruitment and retention and subjective, self-report measures of fatigue and physical functioning. These subjective measures have been shown to be less valid than objective measures. Scores are  vulnerable  to participants knowing what condition they are assigned to (called ‘being unblinded’) and their perception of which intervention the investigators prefer.

It is notable that in the PACE trial of CBT and GET for chronic fatigue syndrome in adults, the investigators manipulated participants’ self-reports with praise in newsletters sent out during the trial . The investigators also switched their scoring of the self-report measures and produced results that they later conceded to have been exaggerated by their changing in scoring of the self-report measures [http://www.wolfson.qmul.ac.uk/current-projects/pace-trial#news ].

Irish ME/CFS Association Officer & Tom Kindlon
Tom Kindlon, Irish ME/CFS Association Officer

See an excellent commentary by Tom Kindlon at PubMed Commons [What’s that? ]

The validity of using subjective outcome measures as primary outcomes is questionable in such a trial

The bottom line is that the investigators have a poorly designed study with inadequate control condition. They have chosen subjective self-reports that are prone to invalidity and manipulation over objective measures like actual changes in activity or practical real-world measures like school attendance. Not very good science here. But they are asking parents to sign their children up.

What is promised to parents consenting to have the children enrolled in the trial?

The published protocol to which the investigators supposedly committed themselves stated

What are the possible benefits and risks of participating?
Participants will not benefit directly from taking part in the study although it may prove enjoyable contributing to the research. There are no risks of participating in the study.

Version 7 of the information sheet provided to parents, states

Your child may benefit from the treatment they receive, but we cannot guarantee this. Some children with CFS/ME like to know that they are helping other children in the future. Your child may also learn about research.

Survey assessments conducted by the patient community strongly contradict the suggestion that there is no risk of harm with GET.

alemAlem Matthees, the patient activist who obtained release of the PACE data and participated in reanalysis has commented:

“Given that post-exertional symptomatology is a hallmark of ME/CFS, it is premature to do trials of graded exercise on children when safety has not first been properly established in adults. The assertion that graded exercise is safe in adults is generally based on trials where harms are poorly reported or where the evidence of objectively measured increases in total activity levels is lacking. Adult patients commonly report that their health was substantially worsened after trying to increase their activity levels, sometimes severely and permanently, therefore this serious issue cannot be ignored when recruiting children for research.”

See also

Kindlon T. Reporting of harms associated with graded exercise therapy and cognitive behavioural therapy in myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome. Bulletin of the IACFS/ME. 2011;19(2):59-111.

This thorough systematic review reports inadequacy in harm reporting in clinical trials, but:

Exercise-related physiological abnormalities have been documented in recent studies and high rates of adverse  reactions  to exercise have been  recorded in  a number of  patient surveys. Fifty-one percent of  survey respondents (range 28-82%, n=4338, 8 surveys) reported that GET worsened their health while 20% of respondents (range 7-38%, n=1808, 5 surveys) reported similar results for CBT.

The unpublished results of Dr. Esther Crawley’s SMILE trial

 A Bristol University website indicates that recruitment of the SMILE trial was completed in 2013. The published protocol for the SMILE trial

[Note the ® in the title below, indicating a test of trademarked commercial product. The significance of that is worthy of a whole other blog post. ]

Crawley E, Mills N, Hollingworth W, Deans Z, Sterne JA, Donovan JL, Beasant L, Montgomery A. Comparing specialist medical care with specialist medical care plus the Lightning Process® for chronic fatigue syndrome or myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial (SMILE Trial). Trials. 2013 Dec 26;14(1):1.

States

The data monitoring group will receive notice of serious adverse events (SAEs) for the sample as whole. If the incidence of SAEs of a similar type is greater than would be expected in this population, it will be possible for the data monitoring group to receive data according to trial arm to determine any evidence of excess in either arm.

Primary outcome data at six months will be examined once data are available from 50 patients, to ensure that neither arm is having a detrimental effect on the majority of patients. An independent statistician with no other involvement in the study will investigate whether more than 20 participants in the study sample as a whole have experienced a reduction of ≥ 30 points on the SF-36 at six months. In this case, the data will then be summarised separately by trial arm, and sent to the data monitoring group for review. This process will ensure that the trial team will not have access to the outcome data separated by treatment arm.

A Bristol University website indicates that recruitment of the SMILE trial was completed in 2013. The trial was thus completed a number of years ago, but these valuable data have never been published.

The only publication from the trial so far uses selective quotes from child participants that cannot be independently evaluated. Readers are not told how representative these quotes, the outcomes for the children being quoted or the overall outcomes of the trial.

Parslow R, Patel A, Beasant L, Haywood K, Johnson D, Crawley E. What matters to children with CFS/ME? A conceptual model as the first stage in developing a PROM. Archives of Disease in Childhood. 2015 Dec 1;100(12):1141-7.

The “evaluation” of the quack Lightning Treatment in the SMILE trial and quotes from patients have also been used to promote Parker’s products as being used in NHS clinics.

How can I say the Lightning Process is quackery?

 Dr. Crawley describes the Lightning Process in the Research Ethics Application Form for the SMILE study as   ombining the principles of neurolinguistic programming, osteopathy, and clinical hypnotherapy.

That is an amazing array of three different frameworks from different disciplines. You would be hard pressed to find an example other than the Lightning Process that claimed to integrate them. Yet, any mechanisms for explaining therapeutic interventions cannot be a creative stir fry of whatever is on hand being thrown together. For a treatment to be considered science-based, there has to be a solid basis of evidence that these presumably complex processes fit together as assumed and work as assumed. I challenge Dr. Crawley or anyone else to produce a shred of credible, peer-reviewed evidence for the basic mechanism of the Lightning Process.

The entry for Neuro-linguistic programming (NLP) in Wikipedia states

There is no scientific evidence supporting the claims made by NLP advocates and it has been discredited as a pseudoscience by experts.[1][12] Scientific reviews state that NLP is based on outdated metaphors of how the brain works that are inconsistent with current neurological theory and contain numerous factual errors.[13][14

The respected Skeptics Dictionary offers a scathing critique of Phil Parker’s Lightning Process. The critique specifically cites concerns that Crawley’s SMILE trial switched outcomes to increase the likelihood of obtaining evidence of effectiveness.

 The Hampshire (UK) County Council Trading Standards Office filed a formal complaint against Phil Parker for claims made on the Lightning Process website concerning effects on CFS/ME:

The “CFS/ME” page of the website included the statements “Our survey found that 81.3 %* of clients report that they no longer have the issues they came with by day three of the LP course” and “The Lightning Process is working with the NHS on a feasibility study, please click here for further details, and for other research information click here”.

parker nhs advert
Seeming endorsements on Parker’s website. Two of them –Northern Ireland and NHS Suffolk subsequently complained that use of their insignias was unauthorized and they were quickly removed.

The “working with the NHS” refers to the collaboration with Dr. Easter Crawley.

The UK Advertising Standards Authority upheld this complaint, as well as about Parker’s claims about effectiveness with other conditions, including  multiple sclerosis, irritable bowel syndrome and fibromyalgia

 Another complaint in 2013 about claims on Phil Parker’s website was similarly upheld:

 The claims must not appear again in their current form. We welcomed the decision to remove the claims. We told Phil Parker Group not to make claims on websites within their control that were directly connected with the supply of their goods and services if those claims could not be supported with robust evidence. We also told them not to refer to conditions for which advice should be sought from suitably qualified health professionals.

 As we will see, these upheld charges of quackery occurred when parents of children participating in the SMILE trial were being vilified in the BMJ and elsewhere. Dr. Crawley was prominently featured in this vilification and was quoted in a celebration of its success by the Science Media Centre, which had orchestrated the vilification.

Captured cfs praker ad

The Research Ethics Committee approval of the SMILE trial and the aftermath

 I was not very aware of the CFS/ME literature, and certainly not all its controversies when the South West Research Ethics Committee (REC) reviewed the application for the SMILE trial and ultimately approved it on September 8, 2010.

I would have had strong opinions about it. I only first started blogging a little afterwards.  But I was very concerned about any patients being exposed to alternative and unproven medical treatments in other contexts that were not evidence-based – even more so to treatments for which promoters claimed implausible mechanisms by which they worked. I would not have felt it appropriate to inflict the Lightning Process on unsuspecting children. It is insufficient justification to put them a clinical trial simply because a particular treatment has not been evaluated.

 Prince Charles once advocated organic coffee enemas to treat advanced cancer. His endorsement generated a lot of curiosity from cancer patients. But that would not justify a randomized trial of coffee enemas. By analogy, I don’t think Dr. Esther Crawley had sufficient justification to conduct her trial, especially without warnings that that there was no scientific basis to expect the Lightning Process to work or that it would not hurt the children.

 I am concerned about clinical trials that have little likelihood of producing evidence that a treatment is effective, but that seemed designed to get these treatments into routine clinical care. it is now appreciated that some clinical trials have little scientific value but serve as experimercials or means of placing products in clinical settings. Pharmaceutical companies notoriously do this.

As it turned out, the SMILE trial succeeded admirably as a promotion for the Lightning Process, earning Phil Parker unknown but substantial fees through its use in the SMILE trial, but also in successful marketing throughout the NHS afterwards.

In short, I would been concerned about the judgment of Dr. Esther Crawley in organizing the SMILE trial. I would been quite curious about conflicts of interest and whether patients were adequately informed of how Phil Parker was benefiting.

The ethics review of the SMILE trial gave short shrift to these important concerns.

When the patient community and its advocate, Dr. Charles Shepherd, became aware of the SMILE trial’s approval, there were protests leading to re-evaluations all the way up to the National Patient Safety Agency. Examining an Extract of Minutes from South West 2 REC meeting held on 2 December 2010, I see many objections to the approval being raised and I am unsatisfied by the way in which they were discounted.

Patient, parent, and advocate protests escalated. If some acted inappropriate, this did not undermine the righteousness of others legitimate protest. By analogy, I feel strongly about police violence aimed against African-Americans and racist policies that disproportionately target African-Americans for police scrutiny and stoppng. I’m upset when agitators and provocateurs become violent at protests, but that does not delegitimize my concerns about the way black people are treated in America.

Dr. Esther Crawley undoubtedly experienced considerable stress and unfair treatment, but I don’t understand why she was not responsive to patient concerns nor  why she failed to honor her responsibility to protect child patients from exposure to unproven and likely harmful treatments.

Dr. Crawley is extensively quoted in a British Medical Journal opinion piece authored by a freelance journalist,  Nigel Hawkes:

Hawkes N. Dangers of research into chronic fatigue syndrome. BMJ. 2011 Jun 22;342:d3780.

If I had been on the scene, Dr. Crawley might well have been describing me in terms of how I would react, including my exercising of appropriate, legally-provided means of protest and complaint:

Critics of the method opposed the trial, first, Dr Crawley says, by claiming it was a terrible treatment and then by calling for two ethical reviews. Dr Shepherd backed the ethical challenge, which included the claim that it was unethical to carry out the trial in children, made by the ME Association and the Young ME Sufferers Trust. After re-opening its ethical review and reconsidering the evidence in the light of the challenge, the regional ethical committee of the NHS reiterated its support for the trial.

There was arguably some smearing of Dr. Shepherd, even in some distancing of him from the action of others:

This point of view, if not the actions it inspires, is defended by Charles Shepherd, medical adviser to and trustee of the ME Association. “The anger and frustration patients have that funding has been almost totally focused on the psychiatric side is very justifiable,” he says. “But the way a very tiny element goes about protesting about it is not acceptable.

This article escalated with unfair comparisons to animal rights activists, with condemnation of appropriate use of channels of complaint – reporting physicians to the General Medical Council.

The personalised nature of the campaign has much in common with that of animal rights activists, who subjected many scientists to abuse and intimidation in the 1990s. The attitude at the time was that the less said about the threats the better. Giving them publicity would only encourage more. Scientists for the most part kept silent and journalists desisted from writing about the subject, partly because they feared anything they wrote would make the situation worse. Some journalists have also been discouraged from writing about CFS/ME, such is the unpleasant atmosphere it engenders.

While the campaigners have stopped short of the violent activities of the animal rights groups, they have another weapon in their armoury—reporting doctors to the GMC. Willie Hamilton, an academic general practitioner and professor of primary care diagnostics at Peninsula Medical School in Exeter, served on the panel assembled by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) to formulate treatment advice for CFS/ME.

Simon Wessely and the Principal Investigator of the PACE trial, Peter White, were given free rein to dramatize their predicament posed by the protest. Much later, in the 2016 Lower Tribunal Hearing, testimony would be given by PACE

Co-Investigator Trudie Chalder would much later (2016) cast doubt on whether the harassment was as severe or violent as it was portrayed. Before that, the financial conflicts of interest of Peter White that were denied in the article would be exposed.

In response to her testimony, the UK Information Officer stated:

Professor Chalder’s evidence when she accepts that unpleasant things have been said to and about PACE researchers only, but that no threats have been made either to researchers or participants.

But in 2012, a pamphlet celebrating the success of The Science Media Centre started by Wessely would be rich in indiscreet quotes from Esther Crawley. The article in BMJ was revealed to be part of a much larger orchestrated campaign to smear, discredit and silence patients, parents, advocates and their allies.

Dr. Esther Crawley’s participation in a campaign organized by the Science Media Center to discredit patients, parents, advocates and supporters.

 The SMC would later organize a letter writing campaign to Parliament in support of Peter White and his refusal to release the PACE data to Alem Mattheees who had made a requestunder the Freedom of Information Act. The letter writing campaign was an effort to get scientific data excluded from the provisions of the freedom of information act. The effort failed and the data were subsequently released.

But here is how Esther Crawley described her assistance:

The SMC organised a meeting so we could discuss what to do to protect researchers. Those who had been subject to abuse met with press officers, representatives from the GMC and, importantly, police who had dealt with the  animal rights campaign. This transformed my view of  what had been going on. I had thought those attacking us were “activists”; the police explained they were “extremists”.

And

We were told that we needed to make better use of the law and consider using the press in our favour – as had researchers harried by animal rights extremists. “Let the public know what you are trying to do and what is happening to you,” we were told. “Let the public decide.”

And

I took part in quite a few interviews that day, and have done since. I was also inundated with letters, emails and phone calls from patients with CFS/ME all over the world asking me to continue and not “give up”. The malicious, they pointed out, are in a minority. The abuse has stopped completely. I never read the activists’ blogs, but friends who did told me that they claimed to be “confused” and “upset” – possibly because their role had been switched from victim to abuser. “We never thought we were doing any harm…”

 The patient community and its allies are still burdened by the damage of this effort and are rebuilding its credibility only slowly. Only now are they beginning to get an audience as suffering human beings with significant, legitimate unmet needs. Only now are they escaping the stigmatization that occurred at this time with Esther Crawley playing a key role.

Where does this leave us?

stop posterParents are being asked to enroll in a clinical trial without clear benefit to the children but with the possibility of considerable risk from the graded exercise. They are being asked by Esther Crawley, a physician, who has previously inflicted a quack treatment on their children with CFS/ME in the guise of a clinical trial, for which he is never published the resulting data. She has played an effective role in damaging the legitimacy and capacity of patients and parents to complain.

Given this history and these factors, why would a parent possibly want to enroll their children in the MAGENTA trial? Somebody please tell me.

Special thanks to all the patient citizen-scientists who contributed to this blog post. Any inaccuracies or excesses are entirely my own, but these persons gave me substantial help. Some are named in the blog, but others prefer anonymity.

 All opinions expressed are solely those of James C Coyne. The blog post in no way conveys any official position of Mind the Brain, PLOS blogs or the larger PLOS community. I appreciate the free expression of  personal opinion that I am allowed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

13 thoughts on “Before you enroll your child in the MAGENTA chronic fatigue syndrome study: Issues to be considered”

  1. There is evidence that patients with ME/CFS do not react normally to exercise. This phenomenon is called post-exertional malaise (PEM) and is supported by objective evidence. The Institute of Medicine has provided a summary of the evidence on PEM in their report “Beyond Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Redefining an Illness (2015)” available for free at https://www.nap.edu/read/19012/chapter/1

    The CBT/GET approach is based on the assumption that reduced activity levels are a behavioural problem, and not the consequence of an illness. As such it has confused cause and effect. The science has moved on beyond behavioural explanations.

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  2. It is both alarming that the Magenta and Smile clinical trials have been allowed to proceed. Both are enormously damaging to children with M.E. It has been impossible for children in the UK to have their symptoms taken seriously when the implication is CBT and Graded exercise or the lightenng process could help or improve their condition. Children are being pushed into exercise programs throughout the NHS and into the care of psychologists whilst their physical symptoms are being neglected, undermined, the child and parents undermined. When parents start to protest and try to defend their children from this abuse then social services are called.
    Some of these children are very physical ill , unsupported and completely isolated often bedbound for years. Families are stretched to breakng point providing care. When parents don’t agree with Dr Crawley then she initiates child protection procedures and children or parents are accused of making up their symptoms. There are major ethical issues with these trials but the damage to children and their families has been enormous in the UK and has added to the suffering and burden of this serious Multi-systemic illness.

    Thank you James great article!

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  3. Children need to be protected from this study that is based on the flawed PACE trial.
    In an illness that has PEM (Post Exertional Malaise ) as one of the main symptoms, like ME, there is no place for GET (Graded Exercise Therapy ).

    They need to stop treating this complex multi system illness like it’s all a state of mind. It’s has nothing to do with a wrong way of thinking.

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  4. I would have thought this should trigger the MAGENTA trial, at the very least, to be suspended immediately:-

    http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2004/1031/regulation/31/made

    The Medicines for Human Use (Clinical Trials) Regulations 2004
    ->Suspension or termination of clinical trial
    ->>31.—(1) If, in relation to a clinical trial—
    ->>>(b)the licensing authority have information raising doubts about the safety or scientific validity of the trial, or the conduct of the trial at a particular trial site,
    ->>the licensing authority may, by a notice served in accordance with paragraph (2), require that the trial, or the conduct of the trial at a particular trial site, be suspended or terminated.

    Surely the PACE trial fallout must, as a minimum, count as “information raising doubts about the safety or scientific validity of the trial”. If MAGENTA is allowed to proceed then doesn’t the licensing authority becomes as culpable as the PACE trial authors.

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  5. Crawley also cooks the stats by rediagnosing children with pervasive refusal syndrome when they don’t improve with CBT/GET. Crawley also uses permissive criteria for diagnosing CFS (3 months of fatigue) that likely results in a patient sample with high regression to the mean. At least those are the rumors. Another success story that falls apart when the details are critically examined.

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  6. Thanks for this blog.

    I think the biggest scandal here, amongst all the myriad scandals, is the way patients have been ignored, silenced, disempowered, sidelined… and much worse… bullied, denigrated, smeared, and maligned.

    It seems like a coordinated effort has been undertaken by the PACE authors, the SMC, and others, to use the power of a compliant unquestioning media to falsely portray the CFS patient community as extremists, intent on inflicting harm and damage on researchers, research and patients. Specifically, the patient community has been portrayed as being ideological anti-science extremists intent on damaging the reputations of the PACE trial and the PACE trial authors.

    This coordinated media campaign against patients was a successful PR exercise, with many believing the unchallenged propaganda. These were high-status academics making the claims, so of course they were believed and taken at face value.

    But the claims didn’t stand up to scrutiny in court. The whole narrative came tumbling down under cross-examination.

    Under cross-examination, and scrutiny of the evidence, the whole narrative crumbled. The dangerous terrorists suddenly morphed into benign Twitter users who had never made any threats. The tribunal notice made it clear that there had been no threats against researchers, that QMUL’s evidence had been grossly exaggerated. The tribunal said that benign requests for data should not be conflated with activist behaviour. Prof Chalder acknowledged that no threats had ever been made against PACE researchers. And the tribunal asked the worrying question of whether the researchers were simply seeking to avoid scrutiny.

    The tribunal ruling raises the very serious question of whether the whole narrative against patients (who dared to raise objections or questions about PACE) was designed specifically to silence patients, to avoid scrutiny and to promote academic self interests.

    This raises a further question… in any circumstances is it ethical to falsely smear a patient population purely in order to prop up an academic career? And, if not, what should the professional consequences be for the perpetrators? What professional body should be conducting professional malfeasance enquiries in such circumstances?

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  7. There are now also concerns about Esther Crawley’s involvement in the MEGA project, which is presented as an omics and big data approach to stratifying ME/CFS patients.

    Esther Crawley and Peter White are involved in this project as ME/CFS experts, despite significant patient opposition. That these are even involved calls into question the integrity of the rest of the team. White has engaged in fraud in the PACE trial. Crawley’s unethical behaviour is well described in this blog’s article.

    That aside, the concern is that they (or other BPS model proponents) will introduce flawed definitions of the illness and its symptoms into the project. Crawley and White certainly have a history of downplaying, ignoring, or psychologizing physical symptoms of this illness, or simply conflating this life destroying illness with the not uncommon and often transient symptom of tiredness. On the project’s petition page, the important symptom “post-exertional malaise”, which is an objectively measurable, typically delayed, decline in function with an increase in symptom severity, is referred to as “post-exertional stress”. Redefining words and concepts in a misleading manner is something the PACE authors have done repeatedly, so one wonders if we’re already seeing the redefinition of an important physical symptom to make it fit into a narrative preferred by PACE authors and their colleagues. A vague term such as “post-exertional stress” certainly fits well into a “health anxiety” narrative of patients supposedly worrying excessively about ordinary muscle soreness after exercise, and mistaking this for symptoms of an illness.

    Such a narrative would be particularly easy to construct if permissive case definitions were used. The project plans to recruit patients from NHS referral centers, which are operating according to the BPS / PACE paradigm, with NICE criteria which are permissive. NICE instructs doctors to only refer patients to these centers when they are mildly or moderately affect and believe that CBT and GEt are appropriate. For this, and other reasons, it is likely that this recruitment strategy will exclude or underrepresent the more severely ill.

    In a large and important project, a solid foundation of knowledge and methodology is more important than ever.

    There are also concerns about the patient advisory groups. Patient involvement is important according to MEGA study authors, and two patient advisory groups will be created. No details have been given on how patient representatives will be chosen. It would be problematic if the authors chose patient representatives that are not considered trustworthy by the larger patient community.

    We suspect they will be drawn from the AFME and AYME charities. Many patients don’t trust these organizations. Crawley is medical officer of AYME, and AFME has a history of collaborating with PACE authors and generally being lenient and ignoring problems with the BPS approach and the PACE trial. AFME approved of the removal of actometers from the PACE trial with dubious justifications. It was repeatedly mentioned that patient advisors in the MEGA project will be able to prevent certain data from being collected and certain tests being performed. Will we see important questions not being asked, important data not being collected, important tests not being done because these undemocratic patient advisor groups with ties to the PACE authors believe that doing so is in the best interest of patients?

    In general it is a problem that communications go through the untrusted intermediary AFME.

    ME/CFS Research in the UK needs to divorce completely from the failing BPS model of the illness. Patients hate it, it’s scientifically flawed, and has produced no results when reasonably standards of evidence are applied. Consider that over 12000 patients signed a petition to the Lancet against the PACE trial, while the MEGA study has collected only 2130 signatures (with number of signatures essentially having stopped). The distrust of the BPS model is so great that any project touched by its influence becomes tainted. The MEGA study team should reconsider its current approach and whom it collaborates with.

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  8. I’m afraid I have some very sad news:
    As you know, Esther Crawley has faced criticism over the ethical approval of the MAGENTA Trial. Here is a letter from the Ethics Committiee showing that she has got approval again and in it you will see the arguments she put forward in order to obtain it.
    http://www.bristol.ac.uk/media-library/sites/ccah/cfsme/study-docs/15%20SW%200124%20Confirmation%20of%20favourable%20opinion%2024.11.16%20(1).pdf

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  9. For some reason, your website cuts off the “.pdf” when I click on the hyperlink saying “Document not found” … but if you paste the whole string (including the “.pdf” bit) it does take you to the letter I am drawing your attention to.

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