Power pose: I. Demonstrating that replication initiatives won’t salvage the trustworthiness of psychology

An ambitious multisite initiative showcases how inefficient and ineffective replication is in correcting bad science.

 

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Bad publication practices keep good scientists unnecessarily busy, as in replicability projects.- Bjoern Brembs

Power-PoseAn ambitious multisite initiative showcases how inefficient and ineffective replication is in correcting bad science. Psychologists need to reconsider pitfalls of an exclusive reliance on this strategy to improve lay persons’ trust in their field.

Despite the consistency of null findings across seven attempted replications of the original power pose study, editorial commentaries in Comprehensive Results in Social Psychology left some claims intact and called for further research.

Editorial commentaries on the seven null studies set the stage for continued marketing of self-help products, mainly to women, grounded in junk psychological pseudoscience.

Watch for repackaging and rebranding in next year’s new and improved model. Marketing campaigns will undoubtedly include direct quotes from the commentaries as endorsements.

We need to re-examine basic assumptions behind replication initiatives. Currently, these efforts  suffer from prioritizing of the reputations and egos of those misusing psychological science to market junk and quack claims versus protecting the consumers whom these gurus target.

In the absence of a critical response from within the profession to these persons prominently identifying themselves as psychologists, it is inevitable that the void be filled from those outside the field who have no investment in preserving the image of psychology research.

In the case of power posing, watchdog critics might be recruited from:

Consumer advocates concerned about just another effort to defraud consumers.

Science-based skeptics who see in the marketing of the power posing familiar quackery in the same category as hawkers using pseudoscience to promote homeopathy, acupuncture, and detox supplements.

Feminists who decry the message that women need to get some balls (testosterone) if they want to compete with men and overcome gender disparities in pay. Feminists should be further outraged by the marketing of junk science to vulnerable women with an ugly message of self-blame: It is so easy to meet and overcome social inequalities that they have only themselves to blame if they do not do so by power posing.

As reported in Comprehensive Results in Social Psychology,  a coordinated effort to examine the replicability of results reported in Psychological Science concerning power posing left the phenomenon a candidate for future research.

I will be blogging more about that later, but for now let’s look at a commentary from three of the over 20 authors get reveals an inherent limitation to such ambitious initiatives in tackling the untrustworthiness of psychology.

Cesario J, Jonas KJ, Carney DR. CRSP special issue on power poses: what was the point and what did we learn?.  Comprehensive Results in Social Psychology. 2017

 

Let’s start with the wrap up:

The very costly expense (in terms of time, money, and effort) required to chip away at published effects, needed to attain a “critical mass” of evidence given current publishing and statistical standards, is a highly inefficient use of resources in psychological science. Of course, science is to advance incrementally, but it should do so efficiently if possible. One cannot help but wonder whether the field would look different today had peer-reviewed preregistration been widely implemented a decade ago.

 We should consider the first sentence with some recognition of just how much untrustworthy psychological science is out there. Must we mobilize similar resources in every instance or can we develop some criteria to decide what is on worthy of replication? As I have argued previously, there are excellent reasons for deciding that the original power pose study could not contribute a credible effect size to the literature. There is no there to replicate.

The authors assume preregistration of the power pose study would have solved problems. In clinical and health psychology, long-standing recommendations to preregister trials are acquiring new urgency. But the record is that motivated researchers routinely ignore requirements to preregister and ignore the primary outcomes and analytic plans to which they have committed themselves. Editors and journals let them get away with it.

What measures do the replicationados have to ensure the same things are not being said about bad psychological science a decade from now? Rather than urging uniform adoption and enforcement of preregistration, replicationados urged the gentle nudge of badges for studies which are preregistered.

Just prior to the last passage:

Moreover, it is obvious that the researchers contributing to this special issue framed their research as a productive and generative enterprise, not one designed to destroy or undermine past research. We are compelled to make this point given the tendency for researchers to react to failed replications by maligning the intentions or integrity of those researchers who fail to support past research, as though the desires of the researchers are fully responsible for the outcome of the research.

There are multiple reasons not to give the authors of the power pose paper such a break. There is abundant evidence of undeclared conflicts of interest in the huge financial rewards for publishing false and outrageous claims. Psychological Science about the abstract of the original paper to leave out any embarrassing details of the study design and results and end with a marketing slogan:

That a person can, by assuming two simple 1-min poses, embody power and instantly become more powerful has real-world, actionable implications.

 Then the Association for Psychological Science gave a boost to the marketing of this junk science with a Rising Star Award to two of the authors of this paper for having “already made great advancements in science.”

As seen in this special issue of Comprehensive Results in Social Psychology, the replicationados share responsibility with Psychological Science and APS for keeping keep this system of perverse incentives intact. At least they are guaranteeing plenty of junk science in the pipeline to replicate.

But in the next installment on power posing I will raise the question of whether early career researchers are hurting their prospects for advancement by getting involved in such efforts.

How many replicationados does it take to change a lightbulb? Who knows, but a multisite initiative can be combined with a Bayesian meta-analysis to give a tentative and unsatisfying answer.

Coyne JC. Replication initiatives will not salvage the trustworthiness of psychology. BMC Psychology. 2016 May 31;4(1):28.

The following can be interpreted as a declaration of financial interests or a sales pitch:

eBook_PositivePsychology_345x550I will soon be offering e-books providing skeptical looks at positive psychology and mindfulness, as well as scientific writing courses on the web as I have been doing face-to-face for almost a decade.

 Sign up at my website to get advance notice of the forthcoming e-books and web courses, as well as upcoming blog posts at this and other blog sites. Get advance notice of forthcoming e-books and web courses. Lots to see at CoyneoftheRealm.com.

 

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