Power pose: II. Could early career investigators participating in replication initiatives hurt their advancement?

Participation in attempts to replicate seriously flawed studies might be seen as bad judgment, when there many more opportunities to demonstrate independent, critical thinking.

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This is the second  blog post concerning the special issue of Comprehensive Results in Social Psychology  devoted to replicating Amy Cuddy’s original power pose study in Psychological Science.

Some things for early career investigators to think about.

Participating in attempts to replicate seriously flawed studies might be seen as bad judgment, when there many more opportunities to demonstrate independent, critical thinking.

I have long argued that there should be better incentives for early career (as well as more senior) investigators (ECRs) participating in efforts to improve the trustworthiness of science.

ECRs should be encouraged -and expected- to engage in post publication peer review and PubPeer and PubMed Commons in which to develop way in which such activity can be listed on the CV.

The Pottery Barn rule should be extended so that ECRs can publish critical commentaries in the journals that publish the original flawed papers. Retraction notices should indicate whose complaints led to the retraction.

Rather than being pressured to publish more underpowered, under-resourced studies, ECRs should be rewarded for research parasite activity. They should be assisted in obtaining data sets from already published studies. With that data, they should conduct exploratory, secondary analyses aimed at understanding what went wrong in larger-scale studies that left them methodologically compromised and with shortfalls in recruitment.

But I wonder if we should counsel ECRs that participating in a multisite replication initiatives like the one directed at the power pose effect might not contribute to the career advancement and may even hurt it.

MturkI’ve been critical of the value of replication initiatives  as the primary means of addressing the own trustworthiness of psychology, particularly in areas with claims of clinical and public health relevance. To add to the other reservations I have, I can point that the necessary economy and efficiency of reliance on MTurk and other massive administrations of experimental manipulations can force the efforts to improve the trustworthiness of psychology into less socially significant and may be less representative areas.

I certainly wouldn’t penalize an early career investigator for involvement in a multisite replication. I appreciate there is room for disagreement with my skepticism about the value of such initiatives. I would recognize the expression of valuation a better research practices that involvement would represent.

But I think early career investigator’s need to consider that some senior investigators and members of hiring and promotion committees (HPCs) might give a low rating of publications coming from such initiatives in judging the candidates potential for original, creative, risk-taking research. That might be even if these committee members appreciate the need to improve the trustworthiness of psychology.

Here are some conceivable comments that could be made in such a committee’s deliberations.

“Why did this candidate get involved in a modest scale study so focused on two saliva assessments of cortisol? Even if it is not their area of expertise, shouldn’t they have consulted the literature and saw how uninformative a pair of assessments of cortisol are, given the well-known problems with cortisol of intra-individual and inter-individual variation in sensitivity to uncontrolled contextual variables?…They should have powered their study to find cortisol differences amidst all the noise.”

“Were they unaware that testosterone levels differ between men and women by a factor of five or six? How do they expect that discontinuity in distributions to be overcome in any statistical analyses combining men and women? What basis was there in the literature suggests that a brief, seemingly trivial manipulation of posture with have such enduring effects on hormones? Why they specifically anticipate differences would be registered in women? Overall, their involvement in this initiative demonstrates a willingness to commit considerable time and resources to ideas that could have been ruled out by a search of the relevant literature.”

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“There seems to be a lemming quality to this large group of researchers pursuing some bad hypotheses with inappropriate methods. Why didn’t this investigator have the independence of mind to object? Can we expect a similar going with the herd after fashionable topics in research over the next few years?”

“While I appreciate the motivation of this investigator, I believe there was a violation of the basic principle of ‘stop and think before you undertake a study’ that does not bode well for how they will spend their time when faced with the demands of teaching and administration as well as doing research.”

Readers may think that these comments represent horrible, cruel sentiments and would be a great injustice if they influence hiring and decisions. But anyone who is ever been on a hiring and promotion committee knows that they are full of such horrible comments and that such processes are not fair or just or even rational.

 

 

 

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