Better days: When PLOS Blogs honored my post about fatal flaws in the PACE chronic fatigue syndrome follow-up study (2015)

The back story on my receiving this honor was that PLOS Blogs only days before had shut down the blog site because of complaints from someone associated with the PACE trial. I was asked to resign. I refused. PLOS Blogs relented when I said it would be a publicity disaster for PLOS Blogs.

mind the brain logoThe back story on my receiving this honor was that PLOS Blogs only days before had shut down the blog site because of complaints from someone associated with the PACE trial. I was asked to resign. I refused. PLOS Blogs relented when I said it would be a publicity disaster for PLOS Blogs.

screen shot 11th most accessedA Facebook memory of what I was posting two years ago reminded me of better days when PLOS Blogs honored my post about the PACE trial.

Your Top 15 in ’15: Most popular on PLOS BLOGS Network

I was included in a list of the most popular blog posts in a network that received over 2.3 million visitors reading more than 600 new posts. [It is curious that the sixth and seventh most popular posts were omitted from this list, but that’s another story]

I was mentioned for number 11:

11) Uninterpretable: Fatal flaws in PACE Chronic Fatigue Syndrome follow-up study Mind the Brain 10/29/15

Investigating and sharing potential errors in scientific methods and findings, particularly involving psychological research, is the primary reason Clinical Health Psychologist (and PLOS ONE AE) Jim Coyne blogs on Mind the Brain and elsewhere. This closely followed post is one such example.

Earlier decisions by the investigator group preclude valid long-term follow-up evaluation of CBT for chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). At the outset, let me say that I’m skeptical whether we can hold the PACE investigators responsible… Read more

The back story was that only days before, I had gotten complaints from readers of Mind the Brain who found they were blocked from leaving comments at my blog site. I checked and found that I couldn’t even access the blog as an author.

I immediately emailed Victoria Costello and asked her what it happened. We agreed to talk by telephone, even though it was already late night where I was in Philadelphia. She was in the San Francisco PLOS office.

In the telephone conversation,  I was reminded me that there were some topics about which was not supposed to blog. Senior management at PLOS found me in violation of that prohibition and wanted me to stop blogging.

As is often the case with communication with the senior management of PLOS, no specifics had been given.  There was no formal notice or disclosure about what topics I couldn’t blog or who had complained. And there had been no warning when my access to the blog site was cut. Anything that I might say publicly could be met with a plausible denial.

I reminded Victoria that I had never received any formal specification about what I could blog nor from whom the complaint hand come. There had been a vague communication from her about not blogging about certain topics. I knew that complaints from either Gabrielle Oettingen or her family members had led to request the blog about the flaws in her book,  Rethinking Positive Thinking . That was easy to do because I was not planning another post about that dreadful self-help book.  Any other prohibition was left so vague that had no idea that I couldn’t blog about the PACE trial. I had known that the authors of the British Psychological Society’s Understanding Psychosis were quite upset with what I had said in heavily accessed blog posts. Maybe that was the source of the other prohibition, but no one made that clear. And I wasn’t sure I wanted to honor it, anyway.

I pressed Victoria Costello for details. She said an editor had complained. When I asked if it was Richard Horton, she paused and mumbled something that I took as an affirmative. Victoria then suggested that  it would be best for the blog network and myself if we had a mutually agreed-upon parting of ways. I told her that I would probably publicly comment that the breakup was not mutual and it would be a publicity disaster for the blog.

igagged_jpg-scaled500Why I was even blogging for PLOS Blogs? Victoria Costello had recruited me over after I expressed discontent with the censorship that I was receiving at Psychology Today. The PT editors there had complained that some of my blogging about antidepressants might discourage ads from pharmaceutical companies for which they depended for revenue. The editors had insisted on  the right to approve my posts before I uploaded them. In inviting me to PLOS Blogs, Victoria told me that she too was a refugee from blogging at Psychology Today.  I wouldn’t have to worry about restrictions on what I could say at Mind the Brain, beyond avoiding libel.

I ended the conversation accepting the prohibition about blogging about the PACE trial. This is was despite disagreeing with the rationale that it would be a conflict of interest for me to blog about it after requesting the data from the PLOS One paper.

Since then, I repeatedly requested that the PLOS management acknowledge the prohibition on my blogging or at least put it in writing. My request was met with repeated refusals from Managing Editor Iratxe Puebla, who always cited my conflict of interest.

In early 2017, I began publicly tweeting about the issue, stimulating some curiosity others about whether there was a prohibition. InJuly 2017, the entire Mind the Brain site, not just my blog, was shut.

In early 2018, I will provide more backstory on that shutdown and dispute what was said in the blog post below. And more about the collusion between PLOS One senior management and the PACE investigators in the data not being available 2 years after I requested it.

Message for Mind the Brain readers from PLOSBLOGS

blank plos blogs thumb nail
This strange thumbnail is the default for when no preferred image is provided. It could indicate the haste with which this blog was posted.

Posted July 31, 2017 by Victoria Costello in Uncategorized

After five years and over a hundred posts, PLOSBLOGS is retiring its psychology blog, Mind the Brain, from our PLOS-hosted blog network. By mutual agreement with the primary Mind the Brain blogger, James Coyne, Professor Coyne will retain the name of this blog and will take his archive of posts for reuse on his independent website, http://www.coyneoftherealm.com.

According to PLOSBLOGS’ policy for all our retired (inactive) blogs, any and all original posts published on Mind the Brain will retain their PLOS web addresses as intact urls, so links made previously from other sites will not be broken. In addition, PLOS will supply the archive of his posts directly to Prof Coyne so that he may repost them anywhere he may wish.

PLOS honors James Coyne’s voice as an important one in peer-to-peer scientific criticism. As discussed with Professor Coyne in recent days, after careful consideration PLOSBLOGS has concluded that it does not have the staff resources required to vet the sources, claims and tone contained in his posts, to assure they are aligned with our PLOSBLOGS Community Guidelines. This has lead us to the conclusion that Professor Coyne and his content would be better served on his own independent blog platform. We wish James Coyne the best with his future blogging.

—Victoria Costello, Senior Editor, PLOSBLOGS & Communities

Bollocks!

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